A HOT COFFEE SUMMER: 
How to drink coffee in the heat of summer

It’s summertime! Which means it’s hot – in some places, very hot. But one crucial question remains: is it ever too hot for a steaming cup of coffee? Let’s see what our team around the world has to say about their favorite ways to get a caffeine kick when the temperatures start to rise.

Spoiler: Not everyone is as obsessed with iced coffee as Americans.

Kenya

“Most Kenyans will take their coffee hot or at room temperature. Only a small percentage of people will ask for iced coffee in the summer.” Kenyan coffee shops prepare all sorts of coffee, from house drips to espresso drinks like cappuccinos, lattes and more.

Personally, I like my coffee very milk, with or without cream, and without sugar. But we don’t just drink coffee – we also use the grounds to make body scrubs! It’s as simple as mixing equal parts of fresh coffee grounds with brown sugar and coconut oil.”

– Dorice Lusuli, Kenyan team member

Most of us in the Kenyan office prefer our coffee hot! Renoh, our country accountant enjoys hot mild house coffee with milk and sugar. Grace, our program coordinator, likes her coffee hot, medium strong with milk and sugar. ‘It’s like eating ice cream, except it’s hot!’ she says.

Grace enjoys a cappuccino with a carrot muffin at a cafe

Personally, I like my coffee very milk, with or without cream, and without sugar. But we don’t just drink coffee – we also use the grounds to make body scrubs! It’s as simple as mixing equal parts of fresh coffee grounds with brown sugar and coconut oil.”

– Dorice Lusuli, Kenyan Engagement Facilitator

Latin America

“Coffee time is an important part of the day for Latino families. “If you are invited to a Latin American house, it is very likely that when you arrive you will be offered coffee. No matter if it is winter or summer, coffee is taken hot with a sweet bread in the house. The time for coffee is at breakfast and at 3 o’clock in the afternoon, everyone from children to adults drinks coffee.

In the coffee shops there are a variety of options: you can find espressos, lattes, cappuccinos and more. In Honduras we celebrate National Coffee Day on October 1st, when we honor everyone who works on the coffee supply chain, in particular the people in production. These are the men and women committed to Honduras’ development.”

– Julissa Arana, Latin American Engagement Facilitator

North America

The idea of eating with the seasons is widely applied to American coffee consumption – peppermint mochas in the winter, lavender lattes in the spring, and I think we all know what flavor pops up in the fall (hint: it belongs in a pie for Thanksgiving). But summer? Anything goes (except that pie-flavored one). Here’s just a few summertime suggestions for getting your coffee boost:

  • Iced coffee. The MVP of summertime when you need to cool down and perk up. The iced coffee is like a blank slate. Will you drink it as-is, add milk or sugar or a flavored syrup.
  • Cold Brew. This is another one of those blank slate situations – cold brew is a solid option for a hot day, as are it’s coffee siblings the nitro cold brew (a nitrogen-infused cold brew that has a velvety, thick mouthfeel and served from a tap.) as well as cold brew…lemonade? Yes – it’s a real thing, and you should try it. Cold brew lemonade is exactly what it sounds like, but the taste is something else entirely. It’s flavor is sweet and complex, almost like iced tea.
  • Espresso Tonic. This espresso beverage is decidedly summer-y: this recipe calls for 2 shots of espresso, 2/3 cup of tonic water and a lime wedge, but any kind of citrus, or even herbs like rosemary, are lovely additions.

Personally? 8 times out of 10, I’ll just go for a regular black coffee. But I can’t deny that cold brew lemonade isn’t a little bit life changing, especially in the heat of summer. 

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